5 Things Not To Do When Accused Of Racism: A Note To Paula Deen And The Rest of White America

by Scot Nakagawa

Okay, I know this subject has been beat to death but I need to go there one more time. Why? Because Paula Deen’s crying, pleading, borderline belligerent I is what I is, and I’m not changing play for forgiveness mirrors the way that too many white people react to accusations of racism. And that reaction is no small thing. It’s one of the obstacles to ending interpersonal racism which, as we know, is the justification for institutional racism and the perpetuation of racial inequality.

So, for white people who want to be good allies, here are five things not to do when accused of racism:
1. Cry. By crying, you make the problem all about you. You know, like you’re such a good and sensitive person that no one was hurt by your racism more than you were. Nice try, but in order to believe that, we first have to minimize the damage that’s done by racism, and that kind of undermines the whole idea that you’re genuinely sorry about anything except how you’re being treated as a result of your racist behavior.
2. Trot out your (insert racial minority group here) friends. This is an all too common way of deflecting the accusation without just admitting to the racist act. And, it’s bound to backfire, because instead of being an excuse, it only demonstrates your racism by reducing your friend to her/his race and worse, into an object, specifically a shield, to protect you from having to admit to racism.
3. Blame your age or upbringing. If your age is the problem, it implicates everyone else in your age group in your act of racism, and that’s not a fair thing to do to them in order to protect you. It also blames your racist act on your mother, your father, your teachers, the social climate in the town you grew up in, and every other person or condition that influenced you except, of course, you, the person who had a choice. As history shows us, not everyone was a racist at any time in our history. In every age, every person had and continues to have the ability to choose against racism.
4. Justify racist acts in certain circumstances as in, it’s okay to turn into a racist if someone is holding a gun to your head. If you manage to hold in your racism when you’re at your best, but react to fear or anger by immediately turning to racism, you’re a racist. In fact, fear and anger are at the very heart of racism.

But, while avoiding the four things listed above will probably keep you out of trouble, they don’t actually address your racism. So, if you’re truly just an accidental racist who sincerely wants to make amends, simply admit to it, take what you have coming to you, learn from it, and do something to make a positive difference.

And that brings me to the 5th thing you ought not do when accused of racism. Dodge. Because what distinguishes the accidental racist from an intentional one is the willingness to simply own up to your accidents and make amends.

http://www.changelabinfo.com/2013/06/28/5-things-not-to-do-when-accused-of-racism-a-note-to-paula-deen-and-the-rest-of-white-america#.UdFxZj5IGjJ

Papa John’s drivers fired after leaving racial slur on customer’s voicemail

Two Papa John’s delivery drivers were fired after accidentally butt-dialing a customer and leaving a racist voicemail.

The duo — who worked at the Sanford outlet in Orlando — was heard mocking the man for not leaving a tip.

The angry client posted audio of the message.

Map of hate: Racist, homophobic tweets put on U.S. map… and the Eastern half of the country comes out worst

Floating Sheep and Humboldt State University in northern California collaborated to produce “Geography of Hate” maps like this one that track racist and homophobic tweets in the United States, based on the use of slurs such as the N-word, “wetback” and “fag.”

 

 

A 2012 map produced by Floating Sheep, a blog site maintained by geography scholars, shows the origins of tweets making racist remarks about President Obama following his reelection to a second term.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/survey-plots-hateful-tweets-map-u-s-article-1.1343700#ixzz2TJA2b214

Lisa Lampanelli defends calling Lena Dunham the N-word: It means ‘friend’!

stuff white people do

think they get to decide what’s racist

“Celebrity Apprentice” star and Comedy Central fixture Lisa Lampanelli stoked the ire of the online community Sunday night when she tweeted a picture of herself next to “Girls” creator Lena Dunham after the Writer’s Guild Awards.

The picture — though blurry — wasn’t at the eye of the storm. Rather, it was the caption Lampanelli had written:

“Me with my n—a @LenaDunham o @HBOGirls – I love this beyotch!” Lampanelli, 51, tweeted.

Her use of the racial slur outraged many followers. But Lampanelli later defended her choice of words to The Huffington Post.

“The N-word ending in ‘er’ is far different context from the word ending in ‘a,'” Lampanelli said.

“Ask any person who knows the urban dictionary, it means ‘friend.’ And by the way, if I had put the word ending in ‘er,’ that would have been a very derogatory thing about Lena meaning she is less than me, and I view her as very above me,” Lampanelli continued.

The comic had nothing but praise for Dunham, and was surprised by the firestorm she sparked.

“She was so sweet and I swear to you, I’m the biggest fan of ‘Girls’ in the world, and I just tweeted out our picture. And that’s controversial. Enjoy, people.”

It’s not the first time Lampanelli has landed in hot water over offensive terms. Lampanelli noted that colorful and shocking language has been a staple of her act for many years.

“I have always used in my act every racial slur there is for Asians, blacks, gays, and Hispanics,” the comedienne noted.

“To me, it’s acceptable if the joke is funny and if it is said in the context of no hate. It’s about taking the hate out of the word.”

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