Kenya: 246 schools close, 917 non-Muslim teachers flee because of jihad attacks

Now the 12-year-old’s dream to become a doctor is threatened. Attacks by the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab against non-Muslims have forced the transfer of hundreds of teachers from the border area with Somalia, where the extremist group is based. Schools have closed and thousands of children are affected.

The human rights abuses caused by jihadis in Kenya cause little concern in the West. Yet as the number of victims rises ever higher, instead of taking action to make sure the same things don’t happen in Europe and North America, the West has flung open its doors and allowed Muslims with ties to al Qaeda, the Islamic State and Muslim Brotherhood and al-Shabaab itself to operate in the West.

In this latest situation, al-Shabab could say to the potential recruits: ‘Look, your government cannot even provide you with a modicum of security, come and join us.’

How long will it be before they’re saying that in the West?

 

“Teachers flee, schools close in Kenya with al-Shabab attacks,” by Tom Odula, Associated Press, May 3, 2018:

NAIROBI, Kenya – Every school day, Abdirizack Hussein Bashir rises at dawn for an eight-kilometre (five-mile) trek through a dangerous forest where he sometimes faces harassment by Kenyan army patrols hunting down extremists.

Now the 12-year-old’s dream to become a doctor is threatened. Attacks by the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab against non-Muslims have forced the transfer of hundreds of teachers from the border area with Somalia, where the extremist group is based. Schools have closed and thousands of children are affected.

At least 224 primary schools and 42 secondary schools in Wajir County can no longer function after non-local teachers fled. The exodus was caused by the Feb. 16 al-Shabab attack on a primary school in which two non-Muslim teachers were killed. Kenya’s Teachers Service Commission transferred 329 teachers elsewhere for their safety. Many others left on their own. In all, 917 non-Muslim primary school teachers have left the region.

It is the largest-ever mass exodus of teachers from the region, observers say.

Analysts say the extremist group threatens gains in education in a region that until recently was the most marginalized in Kenya and has been described as a hotbed for recruitment for extremist groups, which oppose Western education. Children out of school become easy targets.

For al-Shabab the closure of schools will be seen as “a success,” said Abdullahi Boru Halakhe, an expert in countering violent extremism.

“Schools and education is one of the antidotes against the narratives of the (extremist) group. Thus, if you close the school, how else can you build a counter-narrative?” he asked.

Al-Shabab has carried out a wave of attacks in Kenya since 2011, calling it retribution for Kenya sending troops to Somalia to fight the extremists. Attacks include the April 2015 raid on Garissa University that left 147 people dead. Teachers near the Somali border have been targeted, including in a November 2014 attack on a bus in neighbouring Mandera County.

Some 120 non-Muslim teachers have left their posts in Mandera County due to the latest insecurity. The teachers have been sleeping in the Kenya National Union of Teachers boardroom for nearly two months and spend their days camped out at the offices of their employer, the Teachers Service Commission. Police routinely use tear gas on them as they protest and demand better protection from the extremist threat.

“We have asked the government to transfer teachers where they feel safe,” said the union’s secretary-general, Wilson Sossion.

The threat of attack is not the only problem non-Muslim teachers face in the predominantly ethnic Somali region, said Peter Amunga, an education activist. Discrimination by the local community and radicalized students are other challenges. Non-Muslims make up 90 per cent of the teachers in the border areas as marginalization and nomadic culture have limited the number of local ones, he said.

Wangechi Nderitu, one of the teachers camping out at the Teachers Service Commission offices, said one student at a neighbouring school who was punished by teachers went to train with al-Shabab in Somalia for two years then returned in late 2015, took his father’s gun and went after the teachers. Luckily they had been transferred, he said.

Despite teachers’ concerns the government has forced them to stay in the region without providing additional security, Nderitu said. He said his bank accounts had been frozen and that the Teachers Service Commission says they won’t be released until he and his colleague go back to work.

“This is blackmail,” Nderitu said. “That’s why we are stranded here. The Teacher Service Commission did not respond to a request for comment.

The government’s response has been sub-optimal, said Halakhe, the expert in countering extremism.

“While there is an acknowledgement that there are no easy answers to what is obviously a complex and complicated problem, the government has failed even to do even the basic like, for instance, stationing security officers at some of the schools,” he said.

Al-Shabab has exploited the region’s history of marginalization for recruiting and propaganda, he added. The region’s attempt to secede and join Somalia in the 1960s was quashed with military force and successive governments neglected the area until Kenya’s new constitution in 2010 ensured that all regions received resources for development.

“In this latest situation, al-Shabab could say to the potential recruits: ‘Look, your government cannot even provide you with a modicum of security, come and join us,’” Halakhe said…..

https://www.jihadwatch.org/2018/05/kenya-246-schools-close-917-non-muslim-teachers-flee-because-of-jihad-attacks

Prosecutor General promises farmers to investigate their cases

Prosecutor-General Jaromír Čižnár promised farmers that he would investigate their cases directly at the Prosecutor-General’s Office, stated representatives of the farmers’ initiative after meeting with the prosecutor general in Bratislava on Thursday. The district and regional prosecutor’s offices should thus be excluded from the investigation. Farmers are seeking a review of procedures carried out by law enforcement bodies in specific criminal cases. “The promise made by the Prosecutor-General’s Office was that these specific criminal cases would be immediately requested by the Prosecutor-General’s Office and would be examined directly by a prosecutor at the Prosecutor-General’s Office,” said the Prosecutor-General’s Office spokesperson Andrea Predajňová.

 

http://enrsi.rtvs.sk/articles/news/163524/prosecutor-general-promises-farmers-to-investigate-their-cases

More Swirling Aspirations Huh?  Keep On Dreaming Issa

More Swirling Aspirations Huh? Keep On Dreaming Issa

Exposing Corruption Under Every Rock

Evidence:

http://www.issarae.com/

Here we have yet another unattractive, masculine looking misandrist, feminist promoting Jezebel by the name of Issa Rae who honestly believes that because Asian men are bottom of the pile when it comes to women’s dating choices and because black women are bottom of the pile when it comes to men’s dating options, that both groups somehow are suited and should link together and form blasian unions.

What the overbite suffering black harridan Rae doesn’t seem to realise is that Asian men are some of the non black men who are least likely to deal with black women, themselves along side Arabs, Pakistanis, Indians and other men from the Middle East. I have to laugh every time I see black women such as Rae and the high priestess of swirl mountain, one Miss Christelyn Karazin promoting the idea of black women crossing over the fence with ease and…

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Ombudswoman: freedom of speech is a basic principle of democracy

03. 05. 2018 14:02

“Freedom of speech and the right to information are among the basic principles of democracy. Without the free work of journalists, a democratic society or a rule of law cannot exist,” said Slovak Ombudswoman Mária Patakyová on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, which is May 3rd. She added that in order to protect fundamental human rights it is necessary to pay more attention to the safety and security of journalists. Meanwhile a group of actors and about 190 journalists from a variety of media outlets marked the day by expressing support for journalists of the public broadcaster RTVS, which is the mother company of Radio Slovakia International. A series of resignations and dismissals have taken place in recent weeks following disagreements between journalists and part of the management. On Wednesday a spokesperson for RTVS Erika Rusnáková said that the broadcaster has a legally elected general manager and an appointed management that works for the benefit of the public.

 

http://enrsi.rtvs.sk/articles/news/163337/ombudswoman-freedom-of-speech-is-a-basic-principle-of-democracy