Vancouver short-term rentals to display licence in deal with Airbnb

Vancouver and Airbnb have signed a deal that will require short-term rental hosts to display a business licence.

The city says under the deal, Airbnb will include a field for all hosts to list their short-term rental business licence, and new hosts will be required to include a business licence as part of their profile.

Existing hosts have until Aug. 31 to obtain a short-term rental business licence from the city and include it on their online listings. After that, Airbnb will deactivate existing listings that do not include a business licence.

The city estimates there are about 6,600 short-term listings in Vancouver, and Airbnb represents over 88 per cent of the Vancouver market.

Vancouver short-term rentals to display licence in deal with Airbnb

University of Washington: Prof put on probation for mentioning her Christian faith in front of Muslim student

This is how Islamic supremacist and Leftist students are shutting down free discourse all over the country: by claiming that it makes them feel “unsafe.” At Stanford University, fascist students and faculty whipped up hysteria on campus in advance of my visit by claiming that my telling the truth about the nature and magnitude of the jihad threat would make Muslim students on campus feel “unsafe.” There was not a shred of evidence to support this claim, and of course no one was harmed in the aftermath of my appearance there, which was disrupted in any case by a planned and scripted walkout in which administrators made sure as few people as possible would hear me by preventing others who wanted to attend from entering after the walkout. This is life on university campuses today: American universities are no longer centers of higher learning, but are radioactive wastelands of hard-Left indoctrination. This holds true not just for huge universities such as Stanford, but also even for the smallest and ostensibly faith-based schools, such as Saint Anselm College in New Hampshire. Everywhere the hard-Left indoctrination is dominant, and there is little to no actual education going on.

 

“UW administrator: ‘Do you read your Bible on campus?!,’” Todd Herman Show, April 10, 2018 (thanks to Undaunted):

Susana Asberry has been a full-time instructor at the University of Washington since 2006. She teaches English as a second language. On Monday, she shared exclusively with us how she has been put on probation for daring to mention God in direct response to a question from a student.

Asberry also helped students in an argumentative essay writing class debate against gay marriage — a topic the students chose to address. As of Tuesday, she is being sent to what amounts to a re-education session. She is accused of being discriminatory and even racist. Asberry is white and married to a black man. Their children are bi-racial. She says she is being censored and feels threatened.

How did this all start? During a writing unit that involved American slang, the students learned about the phrase “bucket list” and submitted their own examples. A student asked Susana about her bucket list and Susana replied: “When I retire, I want to share the word of God with people.”

One student complained. As an observant Muslim, who covers her body as part of her faith, she said she was made to feel unsafe. According to Susana, that is when her career changed.

As she explained on the program, Susana says she was drawn into an investigative process where her Director, James C. Evans asked her in an angry, accusatory tone: “Do you read your Bible at on campus?”

That was just the beginning of her odyssey. I want you to hear Susana, who grew up in the former Czech Republic, describe how she was treated by the University of Washington. It reminds her of how her loved ones were abused by Russian authorities when the Soviet Union invaded her birth Country.

Susana spoke out because she is concerned for future generations of teachers and students.

You can listen to our interview here.

We have reached out to the University of Washington for a response. Through a spokesperson, the University said they will consider making a statement.

I am sharing, below, her letter to us.

In 2015, a female Muslim student filed a formal complaint against me stating that I had made comments about God during and after my class that were offensive to her and that I had not promoted a positive learning environment. Once during this class, I was teaching the term “bucket list” because it was in our textbook chapter, and students had to make a list of what would be on their bucket list and that is when a student wanted to know what would be on mine. I replied that I would like to tell people about God. Another time with this female Muslim student was outside my classroom when she was crying. She was very upset and disclosed to me that her husband was cheating on her. Trying to comfort her, I simply told her that during difficult times, I pray. Her complaint was made soon after she received a failing grade in this class at the end of that quarter. As a result of her complaint, I was summoned to a formal meeting with my Director, James C. Evans and Human Resources, and a warning letter was issued saying that I had violated the UW’s executive Order 31, a Nondiscrimination and Non-retaliation policy.  Disregarding the fact that other Muslim students were in this class and that I had received high student evaluations at the end of that quarter. During this particular meeting, my Director asked me a question pertaining to my religion, “Do your read your Bible on campus?” In the final warning letter, the administration forbade me any mentioning of “God” or referencing to my religious belief such as praying. They concluded that my comments had harassed and discriminated against this female Muslim student. I disputed the incident with my union and only a copy of a letter of this incidence was placed into my employee personal file….

Due to discrimination and harassment because of my religion, my work place has become a hostile environment, and I am now afraid to teach. I did not, never have and do not discriminate against nor harass any of my students.

Sincerely,

Susana Asberry

 

https://www.jihadwatch.org/2018/04/university-of-washington-prof-put-on-probation-for-mentioning-her-christian-faith-in-front-of-muslim-student

Want to keep black kids from running away from home? Stop hitting them.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2017/04/07/want-to-keep-black-kids-from-running-away-from-home-stop-hitting-them/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.941ebc5182e8

Last month, a rumor that more than 500 mostly black and Latino children from the District of Columbia had been abducted and sold into sex slavery went viral on social media. A new decision by D.C. police to alert the public whenever children were reported missing had backfired; most of the kids had been found safe within 24 hours, but those updates never spread as far as the initial reports. Worried people, from the Congressional Black Caucus to LL Cool J, raised alarms over what looked like a sudden epidemic that was being ignored in ways that would be unimaginable with white children.

Hoping to quell the outrage, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser assured the public that there has been no surge of missing kids. “But that doesn’t mean there aren’t children that need our help,” she said March 24 as she unveiled plans to create a task force to work with vulnerable teenagers.

Hundreds of children of color have been reported missing in D.C. at some point since January, but those numbers aren’t higher than usual. The police say 2,242 children were reported missing in 2016, down from 2,433 in 2015. Virtually all of them were found unharmed within 24 hours; in many cases the children, who showed no evidence of being exploited by sex traffickers, had repeatedly run away from home, according to a spokesman for the mayor.

Last month, a rumor that more than 500 mostly black and Latino children from the District of Columbia had been abducted and sold into sex slavery went viral on social media. A new decision by D.C. police to alert the public whenever children were reported missing had backfired; most of the kids had been found safe within 24 hours, but those updates never spread as far as the initial reports. Worried people, from the Congressional Black Caucus to LL Cool J, raised alarms over what looked like a sudden epidemic that was being ignored in ways that would be unimaginable with white children.

Hoping to quell the outrage, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser assured the public that there has been no surge of missing kids. “But that doesn’t mean there aren’t children that need our help,” she said March 24 as she unveiled plans to create a task force to work with vulnerable teenagers.

Hundreds of children of color have been reported missing in D.C. at some point since January, but those numbers aren’t higher than usual. The police say 2,242 children were reported missing in 2016, down from 2,433 in 2015. Virtually all of them were found unharmed within 24 hours; in many cases the children, who showed no evidence of being exploited by sex traffickers, had repeatedly run away from home, according to a spokesman for the mayor.

A disturbing number of children in D.C. and elsewhere are gambling that life on the street could not be worse than their abusive homes. I made the same choice in 1987 and in 1991 while growing up in Trenton, N.J.

I ran away from my adoptive family when I was 9 and again when I was 12. After the second time, I refused to go back, and I ended up yet another black child in New Jersey’s foster-care system. A warm bed and steady meals in my adoptive home were not worth constant “whuppings” and verbal abuse — which my adoptive parents and the wider black community said were love, discipline and protection from the police or white racists. I felt safer on my own, even if that meant living on the street. From age 12 to 14, I was shuttled between foster homes, youth shelters and group homes, until I was fortunate enough to win an academic scholarship to the Lawrenceville Prep School. So I understand where many of these kids are coming from.

My own experiences helped shape my role as an advocate for children, and it’s painful to see how common such abuse still is in my community. Without question, the toughest part of my work is convincing black people that a “no hitting” zone at home is crucial to helping children feel and be safe. Whupping kids is not “a black thing.” But parents argue that without whuppings, their children will end up in prison, even though we’ve been having national conversations about mass incarceration for decades. They cherry-pick Old Testament scriptures to justify hitting. They argue that there’s a difference between spanking and abuse, as if a child’s body experiences pain differently based on what parents call a swat or the intent behind it. And many people proclaim that they were whupped as children and “turned out fine,” even though they’ve grown up to see striking a child’s body as normal behavior. It’s a violent, unnecessary parenting practice planted in our culture through colonialism, slavery, forced indoctrination into Christianity and centuries of racial trauma.

If we are going to talk about missing children in D.C., we must look at beating kids as one of the root issues. Yes, sex trafficking does happen, and yes, the types of children who go missing in Washington and other cities — mostly black; mostly poor; disproportionately lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer — are more vulnerable than other kids. But neglect and abuse are among the most common factors.

So much of our national focus on black children is on how “bad” they are: how they need more physical punishment, zero tolerance at school, harsh sentences from the courts. They are blamed for their own deaths at the hands of adults who claimed they were afraid of them. That systemic devaluation of black children even extends into classrooms. In 19 states, students are still subject to corporal punishment; a disproportionately higher number of black children receive it. According to reports by the Education Department’s office of civil rights and Human Rights Watch, racial bias contributes to this problem, along with black parents signing opt-in forms empowering teachers and administrators to hit their children.

These messages have consequences. When black children are constantly told that they are a problem, that they are unworthy and undeserving of empathy and kindness, that they can be beaten in schools, in the streets, by cops and by the people who love them, running away from home doesn’t seem like such an extreme choice. If home so often isn’t a safe haven, should we be surprised?

The best way to keep black children out of the headlines — to protect them from a predatory foster-care system, the school-to-prison pipeline, sex traffickers and other traps — is to make their homes safer and more loving. That means more parental education on child development, so parents can set reasonable expectations for their children, as well as giving parents information on non-violent discipline practices. Churches need to become safe sanctuaries that reinforce positive parenting strategies, instead of having clergy who preach “spare the rod, spoil the child.” We need to send a strong message to black youths that their families and community institutions will protect them by providing counseling, advocacy, shelter, safety planning and emotional support. Service agencies need ethnically diverse, culturally competent staff members who will avoid policies and practices that perpetuate trauma and institutionalized racism. Unfortunately, there’s no quick fix for impoverished communities dealing with generations of poverty, trauma and divestment.

Black children’s lives need to matter before they become a statistic or a hashtag. But the blame doesn’t rest entirely on outside forces. We need to take responsibility for protecting our children in the place that matters most, so that home is place they’ll run to, and not away from.

Palestinian Authority claims photo of Nazi concentration camp victims as photo of Muslim victims of Jews

 

War is deceit,” said Muhammad (Bukhari 4.52.268), and the “Palestinians” listened closely. Of course, even the “Palestinian” nationality itself is invented.

The Palestinian people does not exist. The creation of a Palestinian state is only a means for continuing our struggle against the state of Israel for our Arab unity. In reality, today there is no difference between Jordanians, Palestinians, Syrians and Lebanese.” – PLO leader Zuheir Mohsen, interview in the Dutch newspaper Trouw, March 1977.

“PA Holocaust abuse: Photo of concentration camp victims misrepresented as Arab victims of Jews,” by Itamar Marcus and Nan Jacques Zilberdik, Palestinian Media Watch, April 11, 2018 (thanks to Inexion):

Just days before Israel’s Holocaust Memorial Day, Palestinian Authority Holocaust abuse and exploitation has reached a new low. PA TV misappropriated a photo showing hundreds of dead bodies at the Nazi concentration camp at Nordhausen, originally a subcamp of Buchenwald, presenting them as Arabs killed by Jews on April 9, 1948 in the Arab village of Deir Yassin.

 

https://www.jihadwatch.org/2018/04/palestinian-authority-claims-photo-of-nazi-concentration-camp-victims-as-photo-of-muslim-victims-of-jews