Operation Mockingbird is ongoing: L.A Times reporter cleared stories with agency before publication

September 4 2014, 1:22 p.m.

 

A prominent national security reporter for the Los Angeles Times routinely submitted drafts and detailed summaries of his stories to CIA press handlers prior to publication, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.

Email exchanges between CIA public affairs officers and Ken Dilanian, now an Associated Press intelligence reporter who previously covered the CIA for the Times, show that Dilanian enjoyed a closely collaborative relationship with the agency, explicitly promising positive news coverage and sometimes sending the press office entire story drafts for review prior to publication. In at least one instance, the CIA’s reaction appears to have led to significant changes in the story that was eventually published in the Times.

“I’m working on a story about congressional oversight of drone strikes that can present a good opportunity for you guys,” Dilanian wrote in one email to a CIA press officer, explaining that what he intended to report would be “reassuring to the public” about CIA drone strikes. In another, after a series of back-and-forth emails about a pending story on CIA operations in Yemen, he sent a full draft of an unpublished report along with the subject line, “does this look better?” In another, he directly asks the flack: “You wouldn’t put out disinformation on this, would you?”

Dilanian’s emails were included in hundreds of pages of documents that the CIA turned over in response to two FOIA requests seeking records on the agency’s interactions with reporters. They include email exchanges with reporters for the Associated Press, Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and other outlets. In addition to Dilanian’s deferential relationship with the CIA’s press handlers, the documents show that the agency regularly invites journalists to its McLean, Va., headquarters for briefings and other events. Reporters who have addressed the CIA include the Washington Post‘s David Ignatius, the former ombudsmen for the New York Times, NPR, and Washington Post, and Fox News’ Brett Baier, Juan Williams, and Catherine Herridge.

Dilanian left the Times to join the AP last May, and the emails released by the CIA only cover a few months of his tenure at the Times. They show that in June 2012, shortly after 26 members of congress wrote a letter to President Obama saying they were “deeply concerned” about the drone program, Dilanian approached the agency about story that he pitched as “a good opportunity” for the government.

https://theintercept.com/2014/09/04/former-l-times-reporter-cleared-stories-cia-publication/

British Hindus Object to Muslim Centre in Non-Muslim Area

Thousands of residents of a largely Hindu area of Leicester have objected to a proposed Muslim prayer room and education centre.

Supporters of the development insist it is not a mosque; however, opponents say it will harm the community, the Leicester Mercury reports.

After a developer applied to convert a vacant warehouse in the Belgrave area of the city into facilities for Muslims, more than 1,435 letters of objection have been sent to planning officials, and 3,569 people signed a petition against the plan.

The council says the supporters of the project claim it will provide local residents with “religious education, especially for those of Islamic faith within the area”.

Many of the concerns sent to the council point out that the area is largely made up of Hindu families so the proposed centre, catering exclusively to Muslims, would be out of place.

The local Labour MP for Leicester East, Keith Vaz, was among those to register opposition, highlighting concerns over traffic, parking, and noise that were also raised in a public meeting he arranged.

Members of the city council’s planning committee will be asked to decide whether to allow the development at a meeting next Thursday, but planning officers have already recommended it is refused.

A city council planning spokesman said: “As a result of the proposed uses, the nature of the property and its location, the proposal would result in increased on-street activity, noise from people and vehicles particularly in the late evening and early morning.

“This would result in significant harm to the residential amenity conditions of nearby residents and other users of the street.”

The report adds: “The concerns regarding community cohesion, potential tensions between the proposed users and the residents or potential riots, a Muslim centre in close proximity to a temple and church and other issues relating to religion are not material planning considerations.”

 

http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/12/09/british-hindus-object-muslim-centre-non-muslim-area/