Chuck Chiang: Many Asian families place blame for strike firmly with teachers

September is the month during which several East Asian countries — especially Chinese-speaking nations — celebrate Teachers’ Day. For international students in B.C. from those regions, the irony is impossible to ignore.

Students traditionally present gifts to their elementary or high school teachers on the various Teachers’ Days (the first Friday of September for Singapore, Sept. 10 in China and Hong Kong, and Sept. 28 in Taiwan).

In China, the gift giving has grown so lavish (think tablet computers, cosmetics and luxury apparel) that Beijing has had to crack down on the practice in conjunction with the anti-corruption campaign launched by President Xi Jinping in 2012.

Some Asian cultures also hold performances honouring teachers. Taiwan in particular puts on elaborate temple ceremonies to celebrate the birthday of Confucius, the legendary educator and philosopher whose teachings helped create the Chinese education system.

B.C.’s teachers are unlikely to be the objects of such reverence this year. Suffice to say that the labour dispute that has now cancelled four weeks of classes (two in June, two so far in September) is not going over well in the province’s Chinese community.

The visceral reactions of Chinese parents (and East Asians more generally) is a curious case study in how wide the cultural gap can be between mainstream Canadians and minority communities when it comes to how some issues are perceived.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Business/asia-pacific/Chuck+Chiang+Many+Asian+families+place+blame/10202757/story.html#ixzz3Dc8ryGTv

EXPOSED: THE SECRET MAILING LIST OF THE GAMING JOURNALISM ELITE

Several prominent gaming journalists across America are part of a secret mailing list on which they discuss what to cover, what to ignore, and what approach their coverage should take to breaking news, Breitbart can reveal.

High-profile editors, reporters, and reviewers from heavyweight gaming news sites such as Polygon, Ars Technica, and Kotaku use the private Google Groups mailing list, which is called Gaming Journalism Professionals or GameJournoPros, to shape industry-wide attitudes to events, such as the revelation that developer Zoe Quinn had a sexual relationship with at least one prominent games journalist — a journalist who had mentioned her and her products in his reporting.

Emails seen by Breitbart from August of this year show Kyle Orland, a senior gaming editor at Ars Technica, discussing the Zoe Quinn scandal. He wrote: “I don’t want to in essence reward the jerks doing this by giving their ‘issue’ any attention at all … I’m not even going to give the bullshit ‘journalism ethics’ excuse for these attacks the time of day.”

Orland continued: “I would LOVE to use my platform to reproach this kind of behavior… but that would go against Quinn’s valid and understandable desire not to have this personal matter publicized by the media… Maybe we should just stick to Twitter to boost the signal on this one, rather than our ‘front pages.'”

 

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-London/2014/09/17/Exposed-the-secret-mailing-list-of-the-gaming-journalism-elite