True Origin of Christian “FISH” Symbol

http://www.godlessgeeks.com/LINKS/fish_symbol.htm

For many pop-culture Christians, the “fish” decal on the back car bumper, or attached to a key chain or door is a symbol of their religion, and a feel-good statement about Jesus Christ. Early Christians used the fish as a recognition sign of their religion. It is also identified as the “Ichthus,” an acronym from the Greek, “Iesous Christos Theou Uios Soter,” or “Jesus Christ the Son of God, Saviour.” Oxford English Dictionary (C.E.) defines “Ichthyic” as “of, pertaining to, or characteristic of fishes; the fish world in all its orders.”
But contemporary Jesus worshippers might be surprised, even outraged, to learn that one of their preeminent religious symbols antedated the Christian religion, and has its roots in pagan fertility awareness and sexuality. Barbara G. Walker writes in “The Woman’s Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects,” that the acronym pertaining to Jesus Christ was a “rationale invented after the fact… Christians simply copied this pagan symbol along with many others.” Ichthys was the offspring son of the ancient Sea goddess Atargatis, and was known in various mythic systems as Tirgata, Aphrodite, Pelagia or Delphine. The word also meant “womb” and “dolphin” in some tongues, and representations of this appeared in the depiction of mermaids. The fish also a central element in other stories, including the Goddess of Ephesus (who has a fish amulet covering her genital region), as well as the tale of the fish that swallowed the penis of Osiris, and was also considered a symbol of the vulva of Isis.

Along with being a generative and reproductive spirit in mythology, the fish also has been identified in certain cultures with reincarnation and the life force. Sir James George Frazer noted in his work, “Adonis, Attis, Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion” (Part Four of his larger work, “The Golden Bough”) that among one group in India, the fish was believed to house a deceased soul, and that as part of a fertility ritual specific fish is eaten in the belief that it will be reincarnated in a newborn child.

Well before Christianity, the fish symbol was known as “the Great Mother,” a pointed oval sign, the “vesica piscis” or Vessel of the Fish. “Fish” and “womb” were synonymous terms in ancient Greek,”delphos.” Its link to fertility, birth, feminine sexuality and the natural force of women was acknowledged also by the Celts, as well as pagan cultures throughout northern Europe. Eleanor Gaddon traces a “Cult of the Fish Mother” as far back as the hunting and fishing people of the Danube River Basin in the sixth millennium B.C.E. Over fifty shrines have been found throughout the region which depict a fishlike deity, a female creature who “incorporates aspects of an egg, a fish and a woman which could have been a primeval creator or a mythical ancestress…” The “Great Goddess” was portrayed elsewhere with pendulous breasts, accentuated buttocks and a conspicuous vaginal orifice, the upright “vesica piscis” which Christians later adopted and rotated 90-degrees to serve as their symbol.

Along with the fish used as a code sign for early Christian communities, the ichthys also found its way into the ritual and decor of church rites. One case in point is the church mitre worn by prelates. Where did this originate? Dr. Thomas Inman discussed this phenomenon in his two volume opus, “Ancient Faiths Embodied in Ancient Names,” (1869). He included a representation of a sculpture from Mesopotamia, observing “It is the impression of an ancient gem, and represents a man clothed with a fish, the head being the mitre; priests thus clothed, often bearing in their hand the mystic bag…”

“In almost every instance,” added Inman, “it will be recognized that the fish’s head is represented as of the same form as the modern bishop’s mitre.” The fish also appears in another sacred iconograph, the Avatars of Vishnu, where the deity “is represented as emerging from the mouth of a fish, and being a fish himself; the legend being that he was to be the Saviour of the world in a deluge which was to follow…”

From its focus of worshipping a god-man born of a virgin to the selection of holidays and symbols, Christianity appropriated the metaphors of earlier pagan religions, grafting them into its own account of the creation and beyond. Few Jesus worshippers are aware of this. Even fewer know that when they flaunt the “Ichthus” or Ichthys on a tee-shirt, car bumper or even the door of a state legislative office as a representation which originated in Christianity, they are in fact, displaying a more ancient symbol indicative of female anatomy and reproductive potency — the very sign of the Great Mother.

3 thoughts on “True Origin of Christian “FISH” Symbol

  1. JESUS WAS A PERFECT JEW!

    HIS MOTHER IS STILL TELLING HIM WHAT TO DO & HE OBEYS HER, BECAUSE SHE IS THE MOTHER OF GOD!

    SHE DOES ALL HIS GIGS TODAY, APPEARING ALL OVER THE WORLD & DRAWING CROWDS AS LARGE AS BRUCE SPRINGSTEIN – ANOTHER JEW!

    BEAT THAT ONE!

    HARRY POTTER EAT YOUR HEART OUT!

  2. Lust, Lies And Empire: The Fishy Tale Behind Eating Fish On Friday

    by Maria Godoy
    April 06, 2012

    Did the pope really make a secret pact to sell more fish? No, but the real story of eating fish on Fridays is much more fantastical.

    Did the pope really make a secret pact to sell more fish? No, but the real story of eating fish on Fridays is much more fantastical.
    Adam Cole/NPR

    It sounds like the plot of a Dan Brown thriller: A powerful medieval pope makes a secret pact to prop up the fishing industry that ultimately alters global economics. The result: Millions of Catholics around the world end up eating fish on Fridays as part of a religious observance.

    This “realpolitik” explanation of why Catholics eat fish on Friday has for so long, many people grew up believing it as fact. Some, myself included, even learned it in Catholic school. It’s a humdinger of a tale — the kind conspiracy theorists can really sink their teeth into. But is it true?

    “Many people have searched the Vatican archives on this, but they have found nothing,” says , a professor emeritus of archaeology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, whose book, Fish On Friday, explores the impact of this practice on Western culture.

    The real economic story behind fish on Fridays turns out to be much better.

    Let’s start with a quick lesson in theology: According to Christian teaching, Jesus died on a Friday, and his death redeemed a sinful world. People have written of fasting on Friday to commemorate this sacrifice as early as the first century.

    Technically, it’s the flesh of warmblooded animals that’s off limits — an animal “that, in a sense, sacrificed its life for us, if you will,” explains , an associate professor at Baylor University and author of Why Do Catholics Eat Fish On Friday?

    Fish are coldblooded, so they’re considered fair game. “If you were inclined to eat a reptile on Friday,” Foley tells The Salt, “you could do that, too.”

    Alas, Christendom never really developed a hankering for snake. But fish — well, they’d been associated with sacred holidays even in pre-Christian times. And as the number of meatless days piled up on the medieval Christian calendar — not just Fridays but Wednesdays and Saturdays, Advent and Lent, and other holy days — the hunger for fish grew. Indeed, fish fasting days became central to the growth of the global fishing industry. But not because of a pope and his secret pact.

    At first, says Fagan, Christians’ religious appetite was largely met with herring, a fish that was plentiful but dry and tasteless when smoked or salted. And preservation was a must in medieval times: There was no good way for fresh fish to reach the devout masses. Eventually, cod became all the rage — it tasted better when cured and it lasted longer, too.

    The Vikings were ace at preserving cod — they “used dried and salted cod as a form of beef jerky on their ocean passages,” Fagan says. And the route the Vikings took at the end of the first millennium — Greenland, Iceland, Newfoundland — matches up with the natural range of the Atlantic cod.

    It’s possible that others may have followed the cod trail to Canada before Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Clues suggest that English may have made the voyage by around 1480 but kept mum on the location lest the competition rush in. By some accounts, both Columbus and John Cabot had heard of these adventures when they set off on their own epic journeys west.

    “Why do people go over the horizon?” Fagan says. “In the case of the North Atlantic after the Norse … they went looking for cod” to satiate the demands of the faithful.

    So that’s the empire part of our saga. Funny enough, while the pope story is a fish tale, an official leader of a church did make fish fasting the law for purely practical reasons. For that story — and the lust our headline promised — we turn to a monarch known for his carnal cravings: Henry VIII.

    By the time Henry ascended the throne in 1509, fish dominated the menu for a good part of the year. As one 15th century English schoolboy lamented in his notebook: “Though wyll not beleve how werey I am off fysshe, and how moch I desir to that flesch were cum in ageyn.”

    But after Henry became smitten with Anne Boleyn, English fish-eating took a nosedive.

    You see, Henry — but Anne wanted a wedding ring. The problem was, Henry already had a wife, Catherine of Aragon, and the pope refused to annul that decades’ long marriage. So Henry broke off from the Roman Catholic Church, declared himself the head of the Church of England and divorced Catherine so he could marry Anne.

    Suddenly, eating fish became political. Fish was seen as a ” ‘popish flesh’ that lost favour as fast as Anglicism took root,” as Kate Colquhoun recounts in her book .

    Fishermen were hurting. So much so that when Henry’s young son, Edward VI, took over in 1547, fast days were — “for worldly and civil policy, to spare flesh, and use fish, for the benefit of the commonwealth, where many be fishers, and use the trade of living.”

    In fact, fish fasting remained surprisingly influential in global economics well into the 20th century.

    As one economic analysis noted, U.S. soon after Pope Paul VI loosened fasting rules in the 1960s. The Friday meat ban, by the way, still applies to the 40 days of the Lenten fast, which ends this Saturday.

    A few years before the Vatican relaxed the rules, , an enterprising McDonald’s franchise owner in a largely Catholic part of Cincinnati, found himself struggling to sell burgers on Fridays. His solution? The Filet-O-Fish.

    While not exactly the miracle of loaves and fishes, Groen’s little battered sandwich has fed millions around the world.

    OH YEAH, ROMAN PRIESTS ARE VIRGINAL CELIBATES, WHO DON’T FUCK, BUGGER OR WANK!

    PEOPLE SWALLOWED THAT ONE, “HOOK LINE & SINKER”, FOR YEARS!

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