HK battleground as fierce wargame rewrites history

A new wargame featuring an invasion of Hong Kong by the People’s Liberation Army against a defending Commonwealth force has taken gamers by storm.
Wargame Red Dragon is based on the 1980s negotiations over the handover between late strongman Deng Xiaoping and the late “Iron Lady,” British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

But there is a twist: defying reality, the negotiations end in a war between the two sides.

The game was made by French video game developer Eugen Systems and has been on sale since Saturday for HK$320 per internet download.

http://thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?we_cat=11&art_id=144675&sid=42101250&con_type=3&d_str=20140422&fc=2

True Origin of Christian “FISH” Symbol

http://www.godlessgeeks.com/LINKS/fish_symbol.htm

For many pop-culture Christians, the “fish” decal on the back car bumper, or attached to a key chain or door is a symbol of their religion, and a feel-good statement about Jesus Christ. Early Christians used the fish as a recognition sign of their religion. It is also identified as the “Ichthus,” an acronym from the Greek, “Iesous Christos Theou Uios Soter,” or “Jesus Christ the Son of God, Saviour.” Oxford English Dictionary (C.E.) defines “Ichthyic” as “of, pertaining to, or characteristic of fishes; the fish world in all its orders.”
But contemporary Jesus worshippers might be surprised, even outraged, to learn that one of their preeminent religious symbols antedated the Christian religion, and has its roots in pagan fertility awareness and sexuality. Barbara G. Walker writes in “The Woman’s Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects,” that the acronym pertaining to Jesus Christ was a “rationale invented after the fact… Christians simply copied this pagan symbol along with many others.” Ichthys was the offspring son of the ancient Sea goddess Atargatis, and was known in various mythic systems as Tirgata, Aphrodite, Pelagia or Delphine. The word also meant “womb” and “dolphin” in some tongues, and representations of this appeared in the depiction of mermaids. The fish also a central element in other stories, including the Goddess of Ephesus (who has a fish amulet covering her genital region), as well as the tale of the fish that swallowed the penis of Osiris, and was also considered a symbol of the vulva of Isis.

Along with being a generative and reproductive spirit in mythology, the fish also has been identified in certain cultures with reincarnation and the life force. Sir James George Frazer noted in his work, “Adonis, Attis, Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion” (Part Four of his larger work, “The Golden Bough”) that among one group in India, the fish was believed to house a deceased soul, and that as part of a fertility ritual specific fish is eaten in the belief that it will be reincarnated in a newborn child.

Well before Christianity, the fish symbol was known as “the Great Mother,” a pointed oval sign, the “vesica piscis” or Vessel of the Fish. “Fish” and “womb” were synonymous terms in ancient Greek,”delphos.” Its link to fertility, birth, feminine sexuality and the natural force of women was acknowledged also by the Celts, as well as pagan cultures throughout northern Europe. Eleanor Gaddon traces a “Cult of the Fish Mother” as far back as the hunting and fishing people of the Danube River Basin in the sixth millennium B.C.E. Over fifty shrines have been found throughout the region which depict a fishlike deity, a female creature who “incorporates aspects of an egg, a fish and a woman which could have been a primeval creator or a mythical ancestress…” The “Great Goddess” was portrayed elsewhere with pendulous breasts, accentuated buttocks and a conspicuous vaginal orifice, the upright “vesica piscis” which Christians later adopted and rotated 90-degrees to serve as their symbol.

Along with the fish used as a code sign for early Christian communities, the ichthys also found its way into the ritual and decor of church rites. One case in point is the church mitre worn by prelates. Where did this originate? Dr. Thomas Inman discussed this phenomenon in his two volume opus, “Ancient Faiths Embodied in Ancient Names,” (1869). He included a representation of a sculpture from Mesopotamia, observing “It is the impression of an ancient gem, and represents a man clothed with a fish, the head being the mitre; priests thus clothed, often bearing in their hand the mystic bag…”

“In almost every instance,” added Inman, “it will be recognized that the fish’s head is represented as of the same form as the modern bishop’s mitre.” The fish also appears in another sacred iconograph, the Avatars of Vishnu, where the deity “is represented as emerging from the mouth of a fish, and being a fish himself; the legend being that he was to be the Saviour of the world in a deluge which was to follow…”

From its focus of worshipping a god-man born of a virgin to the selection of holidays and symbols, Christianity appropriated the metaphors of earlier pagan religions, grafting them into its own account of the creation and beyond. Few Jesus worshippers are aware of this. Even fewer know that when they flaunt the “Ichthus” or Ichthys on a tee-shirt, car bumper or even the door of a state legislative office as a representation which originated in Christianity, they are in fact, displaying a more ancient symbol indicative of female anatomy and reproductive potency — the very sign of the Great Mother.

I Can’t Believe I Now Have To Convince White People That I Like White People

White people, could you please stop flipping out when the topic of white privilege comes up?

Kristina Wong
Apr 14, 2014 at 12:30pm

Broaching the topic of “White Privilege” is not synonymous with “All white people are evil and, I hate them all.” Chill out.

Want to watch a white person rush away from a dinner party? Just bust out phrases like “institutionalized racism,” “white supremacy,” and the oldie but goodie “residual effects of slavery that are still with us today,” and watch a room of white people clear itself out, or, at least, have them stammer out the names of all the black people they are friends with, and then offer another unsolicited list off all the good they’ve done for people of color.

When I talk about systemic racism and historical racial inequalities as it ties into white privilege and modern-day racism, I think I must sound like this to white people: “Hey Whitey! I am going to kill you.” I know this is a lot to ask of white people, but could you please STOP FLIPPING OUT when the topic of white privilege comes up? I’m talking about being defensive, blabbing about how there is no such thing as race (just one human race, which is actually made up of different races), and how you are so gifted as a white person that you “don’t see race.” Ooh, that last one, ouch.

http://www.xojane.com/issues/i-cant-believe-i-now-have-to-convince-white-people-that-i-like-white-people

Tariq Nasheed- Is Gay The New Black?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7FH7_66gRo&feature=youtu.be

 

commentary

 

Published on Apr 19, 2014

New York Times Best-Selling author and critically acclaimed film maker Tariq Nasheed discusses the truth about Black/gay alliances.
This clip is from a live lecture at a Diversity Conference at the University Of Northern Colorado. The full video will be available soon at http://tariqradio.com

Coalition of Canadian pro Palestinian organizations sided with Palestinian “political prisoners,” most of them are convicted terrorists

http://jonathanhalevi.blogspot.ca/2014/04/coalition-of-canadian-pro-palestinian.html

 

Coalition of Canadian pro Palestinian organizations sided with Palestinian “political prisoners,” most of them are convicted terrorists, including suicide bombers captured alive and mass murderers. Demonstrators called Israelis “Nazis” and warned that “Zionists are taking over the Canadian government.”

The Palestine House marked the “Palestinian Political Prisoners’ Day” in series of events, including a demonstration in front of the Israeli consulate in Toronto (April 17, 2014), vigil dedicated to Palestinian political prisoners in front of the Israeli consulate (April 18), panel discussion and a movie screening at United Steelworkers Hall (April 19) and letter writing night at Beit Zatoun (April 20).

The demonstration was organized with coordination with the following organizations Beit Zatoun (a cultural and activism centre in Toronto purporting “to explore issues of social justice and human rights, both locally and internationally”), Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid (CAIA), Canada Palestine Association (CPA), International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network (IJAN), Independent Jewish Voices (IJV), Not In Our Name (NION), Queers Against Israeli Apartheid (QUAIA), Stop the War Coalition (STWC), United Network for Justice and Peace in Palestine/Israel (UNJPPI), Women in Solidarity with Palestine (WSP).

Who are the “Palestinian political prisoners”? Abdullah Barghouthi as an example

It should be noted that most of the Palestinian prisoners were convicted of involvement in terrorist activities. This group include among others suicide bombers captured alive, dispatchers of suicide bombers, mass murderers, leaders of terrorist organizations, terrorists who killed civilians and those who attempted or planned to kill civilians.

One of the so called “Palestinian political prisoners” is Abdullah al-Barghouthi (عبد الله البرغوثي), who was a leading commander of Hamas’ armed wing, the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades, in the West Bank and also one of the organization’s chief bomb makers (“engineer”).

Barghouthi was convicted of involvement in terror attacks that claimed many victims, including the suicide attacks in Café Moment and Sbarro in Jerusalem, the Sheffield Club in Rishon Lezion, and the bus 4 line in Tel Aviv. In total, Barghouti was responsible for the murder of 66 Israelis and the injury of some 500. In 2004 he was sentenced to 67 life sentences.

In his book “The Prince of Shadow” Abdullah al-Barghouthi, who is regarded as one of “political prisoners” by the demonstrators, tells the story of his life focusing on his role in masterminding the series of deadly terrorist attacks aimed at Israeli civilians.