Purdue reported second-highest number of campus hate crimes last year

college campuses becoming hostile places for non-white students.

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Written by AP
Dec 25, 2012

Purdue University reported the second-highest number of hate crimes among the country’s colleges last year, according to statistics compiled by the FBI.

The seven alleged hate crimes reported on the West Lafayette campus in 2011 were the most among Indiana colleges, the Journal & Courier reported. So far in 2012, Purdue police have documented 12 hate crimes.

The University of California at Santa Cruz reported nine hate crimes, the most of all colleges in 2011.

The FBI report said five of the incidents reported at Purdue reflected racial bias and two were related to religion. The offenses involved assault, intimidation and vandalized property.

The largest number of hate crimes last year and this year were reported against blacks, closely followed by Jews. Other alleged victims included Muslims, Asians, whites and a gay man, the newspaper said. The majority were acts of vandalism.

A hate crime is defined in federal law as a “criminal offense against a person or property motivated in whole or in part by an offender’s bias against a race, religion, disability, ethnic origin or sexual orientation.”

One hundred hate crimes were reported in Indiana last year, including 13 on college campuses.

Besides Purdue, hate crimes were reported at Indiana State, Indiana University-Southeast and Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis.

Purdue officials attributed the number of local reports to increased awareness and an online reporting system created in 2010, when Purdue reported 11 hate crimes.

“I am confident that we are getting better reporting now,” campus Police Chief John Cox said. “It is unfortunate but in my experience some crimes against people – sexual assault, battery – go unreported, but now we have software that is in place. We have the ability for anyone on campus, for visitors, to report bias incidents now.”

Tyrell Connor, president of the Purdue Black Graduate Student Association, said the number of hate crime reports show Purdue does have a problem handling discrimination. In the past year, students and staff have held rallies against racial incidents on campus and formed an anti-racism coalition.

“What this immediately says to me is that Purdue’s campus creates an environment that allows for certain individuals to feel comfortable to commit these hate acts,” he said. “My dream would be to actually sit down with top university officials and (incoming) President Mitch Daniels and work together on solving this problem.”

Junior Victoria Loong, a Chinese-American who has criticized classmates’ online insults of Asian students, said statistics are less important than experience.

“Numbers don’t matter; what we’re actually experiencing does,” she said.

The FBI database includes 600 campuses. Of those, 500 – including IU-Bloomington ­– reported no hate crimes, though IU’s annual security report listed three in 2011.

Spike Lee boycotts Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’: ‘Slavery was not a spaghetti western!’

white privilege is when a white man KKKuentin Tarantino can make movies using the n-word in his movies to dehumanize black people and still allowed to make movies. But if you are non-white and defend yourself from a racist white man on facebook comparing your natural non-white features to be being poor and dress in rags you will get fired from your job.

 

 

Spike Lee thinks Quentin Tarantino‘s new slavery revenge flick “Django Unchained” is the wrong thing.

The famed “He Got Game” director says he’s boycotting the new movie because he finds it insulting.

“American Slavery Was Not A Sergio Leone Spaghetti Western. It Was A Holocaust. My Ancestors Are Slaves. Stolen From Africa. I Will Honor Them,” he wrote on Twitter.

The tweet came shortly after he told VibeTV he couldn’t comment on the movie starring Jamie Foxx and Leonardo DiCaprio because he decided not to see it.

“I can’t speak on it ’cause I’m not gonna see it. I’m not seeing it,” he said in a video interview.
“All I’m going to say is that it’s disrespectful to my ancestors to see that film. That’s the only thing I’m gonna say,” he explained. “I can’t disrespect my ancestors. I can’t do it. Now, that’s me. I’m not speaking on behalf of anybody but myself. I can’t do it.”

Lee, 55, even tangled with another Twitter user who took issue with his Holocaust comparison.

“The goal of the holocaust was death and destruction; the goal of American slavery was tobacco, indigo, rice, and cotton,” a post from a user called Rogue Academic read.

“Like Slaves Didn’t Die? What Kind Of Academic Are You? And George Washington Didn’t Own Slaves Too?” Lee responded.

Tarantino, 49, has been the subject of Lee’s ire before.

Lee criticized the “Pulp Fiction” director for his liberal use of the n-word in his third feature film, “Jackie Brown,” a 1997 movie starring Samuel L. Jackson and paying homage to the blaxploitation films of the 1970s.

“I’m not against the word. And some people speak that way. But Quentin is infatuated with that word,” Lee said of Tarantino in an interview with Variety.

“What does he want to be made, an honorary black man?” the “Do The Right Thing” director asked. “I want Quentin to know that all African-Americans do not think that word is trendy or slick.”

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